Episode 13: Hannah Kent

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Australian author Hannah Kent (left) with Book Ends host, Philippa Moore

And just like that, it’s December and the last Book Ends episode for 2013 is (finally) ready for your listening pleasure.

Although this interview took place during a heatwave in September, Hannah Kent‘s haunting and beautifully written first novel Burial Rites, one of the most talked-about Australian débuts of 2013, is actually perfect winter reading!

Burial Rites by Hannah Kent

In 1829, the last public execution in Iceland took place – a man and a woman were beheaded for a brutal murder committed on a remote farm. As there were no prisons in Iceland at the time, the condemned woman, Agnes Magnúsdóttir, is sent to spend her final months on the farm of district officer Jón Jónsson, under the watch of his wife and their two daughters. Horrified to have a convicted murderer in their midst, the family avoid contact with Agnes and regard her as something of a monster. Only Tóti, the young assistant priest appointed to supervise Agnes’s spiritual wellbeing, tries to understand her. As the months pass, the winter deepens and the hardships of rural life force the household to work side by side, the true story of Agnes’s crime unravels and it is revealed to be far more complex than anyone imagined or, more to the point, was willing to believe.

Set against the backdrop of the exquisite Icelandic landscape, which I’ve actually seen with my own eyes so I can attest to how hauntingly beautiful it is, Burial Rites is a compelling read and a moving meditation on human nature, on truth, survival, freedom and on the painful gulf that often exists between how we are seen by the outside world and how we see ourselves. 

Hannah was born in Adelaide in 1985 and found herself in Iceland at age 18 as an exchange student – not in Reykjavik as she thought, but in a remote fishing village in Iceland’s north called Sauðárkrókur…so remote, Hannah couldn’t even find it in her atlas! Despite struggling at first to find her place in the close-knit community there, Hannah fell in love with Iceland and has since returned many times. But it was on her very first visit, as a teenager, that she first heard the story of Agnes Magnúsdóttir and was instantly captivated.

Returning to Australia, Hannah completed a BA and in her honours year, she submitted a creative writing project inspired by Agnes’s story. Encouraged by this (and now certain this was well and truly a story she wanted to write), she then embarked on a PhD in Creative Writing, for which Burial Rites was her project. She submitted the first draft of Burial Rites to the inaugural Australian Unpublished Manuscript Award in 2011, which it went on to win! Burial Rites has now been published in Australia, the UK and the US and has been shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award.

Persist. It’s really important not to let any feelings of insecurity or disbelief in your own ability paralyse you. Just keep on pushing through and maybe accept that you will always feel this way….but you’ll never be objective about your own work and therefore shouldn’t listen to yourself! And be disciplined. Write regularly, even when you don’t want to. Don’t wait until you’re inspired because you’ll so rarely feel that way. Persistence and the ability to work very hard on something consistently pays out a lot more than talent.”

– pearls of wisdom from Hannah Kent in this interview

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I wasn’t ready for the camera!

Highly articulate, funny, modest and generous, Hannah was a delight to interview and this was such an enjoyable hour or so that we spent together in her publisher’s office in London. I can’t wait to see what she does next.  Thank you so much Hannah for being on the show!

You can listen to the podcast here:

Or you can download it in iTunes 

Or download the file separately to your computer.

Guests

Hannah Kent
Australian writer

Publications mentioned

Burial Rites by Hannah Kent (Picador)

Fred and Edie by Jill Dawson (Sceptre)

The Icelandic Sagas (Penguin)

Kill Your Darlings (literary journal of which Hannah is Publishing Director)

You can also read a great interview with Hannah at Bookanista and I’d also recommend reading Hannah’s own account of the Burial Rites journey in the April 2013 issue of Kill Your Darlings.

Credits

Presenter
Philippa Moore
Producer
Tom Schoon 
Music
“Aurora” by Bjork (buy on iTunes

Book Ends, Episode 12: Jessica Brockmole

My guest for Episode 12 is Jessica Brockmole, author of the novel Letters from Skye and the very first American writer on the show.

Jessica Brockmole

Jessica Brockmole – photo by Sarah Lyn Acevedo (from jabrockmole.com)

A lover of books from an early age and a linguist by trade, Jessica began writing her own stories after the birth of her children. She and her young family moved to Edinburgh for a few years, where she kept in touch with family back home mostly through letters and emails. “At that time I was exploring epistolary relationships in my own life, trying to stay in touch and depending on words to hold things together,” she says.

It was on a week away from the bustle of Edinburgh on the more isolated, quiet and dream-like Isle of Skye that Jessica had the idea for her novel, captivated by the atmosphere on Skye and the hidden histories it seemed to have. She started writing Letters From Skye on the way home.

Letters from Skye takes an unusual format for a modern novel – the narrative is entirely in letters, allowing for an intimate and ultimately very compelling read as we get deep into the hearts and minds of these characters as their lives span both two continents and two world wars.

The story follows Elspeth, a poet living on the Isle of Skye before the outbreak of the First World War, and David (or Davey as he comes to be known), who writes to her from America, initially as a fan of her work but eventually, as time goes on, as her friend and lover. However, their blossoming relationship is cut short by the outbreak of war. It is only several decades later, after an early shell from the Second World War destroys part of their house, that Elspeth’s daughter Margaret begins to piece together what really happened.

Now living in Indiana, Jessica’s road to publication was not an easy one – she wrote long into the night after her family went to bed and amassed an eye-watering 200 rejections before finally selling her book. Her resilient and tenacious story is sure to inspire every aspiring novelist out there!

Jessica was in the UK in August for the Edinburgh Book Festival and I was fortunate enough to grab some time with her on her whistle-stop tour of London.  Thank you again Jessica for a thoroughly enjoyable chat!

You can listen to the podcast here:

Or you can download it in iTunes 

Or download the file separately to your computer.

Guests

Jessica Brockmole
American writer

Publications mentioned

Letters from Skye by Jessica Brockmole (Hutchinson)

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (Wordsworth Classics)

Little House On The Prairie by Laura Ingalls Wilder (Egmont)

Credits

Presenter
Philippa Moore
Producer
Tom Schoon 
Music
“Other Side Of The World” by KT Tunstall (buy on iTunes

Book Ends, Episode 9: Adrian Teal

Welcome to another episode of Book Ends, the podcast for writers and book lovers. This episode is a rather momentous one…..not only is the guest the first cartoonist on the show…..but he’s also the first bloke on the programme too!

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Adrian Teal

In this episode, I am in conversation with cartoonist Adrian Teal, author of The Gin Lane Gazette, which was a successful crowd-funded project for independent publisher Unbound.  It was printed in hardback for supporters of the project at the end of 2012 and the trade edition has just been launched in UK book stores this week.

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Ade has been drawing caricatures for as long as he can remember and learned the craft in the workshop of Spitting Image, a satirical puppet show shown on television from 1984 to 1996.  Always interested in the eighteenth-century thanks to an early obsession with the film The Bounty and mutineer Fletcher Christian, Ade worked as a political cartoonist for newspapers and then for historical publications until he came up with the idea for a fictional Georgian tabloid using real life events and figures.  The result is the very funny and clever Gin Lane Gazette, which Ade describes as “an eighteenth-century version of Heat magazine” full of eccentric larger-than-life personalities, scandal and gossip….and all of them are true stories.

“You can stick a pin anywhere you like in the eighteenth-century and you will find wonderful, engrossing, weird, scandalous, sexy stuff…it’s everywhere.” – Adrian Teal in this interview

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“Of The Earl of Sandwich, attack’d by Mr John Wilkes’s Baboon”

gypsywife

“An Account of Mr. George Hanger’s Abandonment by his Gypsy Wife”

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“The Unassuageable Gluttony of Mr. Handel Reveal’d”

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“Of Her Majesty The Queen’s Curious Christmas-Tree”

You can hear all of the above hilarious true tales in the podcast!

On the road to publication, Ade’s brilliant book hit a few roadblocks when he approached mainstream publishers – he was told his idea was too risky and quirky for their lists – but his answer eventually came in the form of crowd-funding his book with independent publishing company Unbound.

“Crowd-funding and subscription publishing is actually a very eighteenth-century concept,” Ade explains.  “Authors would get enough  people to order advance copies of their book and once they had enough, the book got printed.  Unbound is now doing the same thing for the internet-age.”

As with all Unbound projects, Gin Lane Gazette supporters were able to choose from varying levels of pledges – £20 got you a first-edition hardback copy of the book, £85 got you a signed copy of the book and your likeness appearing in its pages.  In fact, I spotted a few familiar faces!  It’s a great way of bringing readers and authors together and getting readers more involved in the publication process where they can make a visible and meaningful contribution to a book they really want to see in print.

In this interview, in addition to sharing the journey of The Gin Lane Gazette, Ade shares some advice and tricks of the trade for budding caricaturists (he uses and recommends Edding 1800 Profipens) and the typical working day of a cartoonist.

And will there be a Gin Lane Gazette II?  Listen to the interview to find out!

You can listen to the podcast here:

Or you can download it in iTunes 

Or download the file separately to your computer.

Ade also has some upcoming Gin Lane Gazette appearances so if you’re keen to meet him and hear more about eighteenth-century scandals and oddities, you can catch him at one of the following:

9 April 2013 at Danson House, Bexleyheath, Kent

15 April 2013 at Benjamin Franklin House, London (free event)

Many thanks to Ade for giving up an afternoon to chat with me and also to the staff at the Cowper and Newton Museum in the charming village of Olney, Buckinghamshire, who kindly let us record the interview on location.  Being the home of eighteenth-century poet William Cowper it was most fortuitous and appropriate!

Guests

Adrian Teal
British cartoonist, writer and eighteenth-century enthusiast

Publications mentioned

The Gin Lane Gazette by Adrian Teal (Unbound)

The Age of Scandal by T.H White (Penguin)

The Bounty (film) (1984) directed by Roger Donaldson (Scanbox Entertainment)

The QI Annual 2009 (Ade did the front cover of this issue)

The Big Story (short film) (1994) by David Stoten and Tim Watts

Credits

Presenter
Philippa Moore
Producer
Tom Schoon 
Music
Concerto grosso Op.3 No.6 in D Major 1.Vivace 2. Allegro and
Concerto grosso Op.6 No.6 in G Minor 3. Musette(Larghetto) 4. Allegro  both by Georg Friedrich Handel
All images from The Gin Lane Gazette are copyright Adrian Teal and used with permission.